Alternating Current

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Innovation Info
Inventor (s): 
Nikola Tesla
Country (invented in): 
US
Year Invented: 
1891
Image Credit: 
http://withfriendship.com/images/b/7676/Alternating-current-picture.gif
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Who invented Alternating Current?

Nikola Tesla invented a generator that produces alternating current.

When did Nikola Tesla invent Alternating Current?

  • 1891

When was the Patent granted?

  • In 1898 patent was granted to Tesla on alternating current.

 

Who was the patent granted to on the Alternating Current?

 

What is Alternating Current?

  •  In 1884, Nikola Tesla first worked under Thomas Edison who is working on direct current and Tesla working with Alternating current.
  •  George Westinghouse bought the patent rights to Tesla's system of dynamos, transformers and motors and he used Tesla's alternating current system to light the World's Columbian Exposition of Chicago.
  •  Alternating Current is an electric current flow in reverse direction periodically having an average of zero, with positive and negative values.
  •  Alternating current is generated by using generators in power plants. These power plants supply the alternating current to our houses and business through the power lines.
  •  The flow of current reverses back and forth constantly. The average number of times current switches back and forth is 60 times for each second.

 

How does the Invention of Alternating Current help?

  •  Alternating current generators are simple, cheaper and more consistent than Direct current generators.
  •  Alternating current changes direction 50 or 60 times per second and can be stepped up to vary high voltage levels, minimizing power loss across great distances.
  •  Alternating current devices can be switched by circuit breakers at low or high voltages.
  •  All the electrical machines designed with alternating current are available at low cost, simple and they are more flexible to work.
  •  The frequency can be very accurately controlled so it is useful in motors that require accurate speed.
     
External References